Treatment

Psoriasis in children is similar to that in adults, but there are some differences, particularly when it comes to treatments. Treatments used for adults may not be appropriate for children due to possible long term or delayed side effects. Decisions on what treatments to use will be based on the type and severity of the psoriasis, the areas of the skin affected and the patient’s age and past medical history.

Infants

Treatment is very conservative, with moisturizers being the cornerstone of treatment. Oatmeal baths and anti-itch creams can help relieve the itching. Always consult your doctor before starting any treatment with an infant. Very mild topical steroids can be considered.

Children

For children with mild psoriasis, sunlight may be helpful. In children with moderate cases of psoriasis, your doctor may suggest regular broad-band or narrow-band ultraviolet light B (UVB) therapy to help clear the lesions. Because of the link between strep infection and outbreaks/flareups,antibiotics may be prescribed to help clear the bacteria. Mild topical steroids can be used.

STELARA® (ustekinumab):

STELARA® blocks the action of two proteins in your body called interleukin 12 (IL-12) and interleukin 23 (IL-23). In people with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis or Crohn’s disease, their immune system may attack parts of their body and that attack uses IL-12 and IL –23. Ustekinumab can block the IL-12 and IL-23 from causing the immune system to attack the skin, nails, joints or the digestive tract.

 

Stelara®  is indicated for:

Pediatric Plaque Psoriasis
STELARA® is indicated for the treatment of chronic moderate to severe plaque psoriasis in adolescent patients from 12 to 17 years of age, who are inadequately controlled by, or are intolerant to, other systemic therapies or phototherapies.

STELARA®  should be used only by physicians who have sufficient knowledge of plaque psoriasis and who have fully familiarized themselves with the efficacy/safety profile of the drug.

For patient information read more here→

Teens

Topical steroids can be used in the appropriate strength. 

Ultraviolet light B (UVB) therapy may be suggested to help clear the psoriasis.

Oral medications may have different side effects for teens, and potent topical steroids need to be applied with caution because they can be absorbed too quickly.

STELARA® (ustekinumab):

STELARA® blocks the action of two proteins in your body called interleukin 12 (IL-12) and interleukin 23 (IL-23). In people with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis or Crohn’s disease, their immune system may attack parts of their body and that attack uses IL-12 and IL –23. Ustekinumab can block the IL-12 and IL-23 from causing the immune system to attack the skin, nails, joints or the digestive tract.

Stelara®  is indicated for:

Pediatric Plaque Psoriasis
STELARA® is indicated for the treatment of chronic moderate to severe plaque psoriasis in adolescent patients from 12 to 17 years of age, who are inadequately controlled by, or are intolerant to, other systemic therapies or phototherapies.

STELARA®  should be used only by physicians who have sufficient knowledge of plaque psoriasis and who have fully familiarized themselves with the efficacy/safety profile of the drug.

For patient information read more here→

Being involved in your child’s treatment

As soon as age appropriate, children should be involved in the treatment. This gives some control over their psoriasis. However, psoriasis treatment can, at times, be frustrating or disappointing, or even uncomfortable. Treatment failure or disappointing results can cause anger and a feeling that there is too much focus on the disease at the expense of other things. For some, treatment can become a difficult, resented task, particularly if a treatment becomes ineffective and the psoriasis worsens.

Many experts advise setting up a treatment centre: in the home, where all medicines and creams can be kept. Children as young as 6 or 7 can often apply creams and moisturizers themselves. For young children, you can try to make their treatment time fun, by making games of topical medications.You can apply creams as “dots” and then connecting the dots, or drawing pictures with the ointments and the “erasing” them with your hands.

As children age, make treatment a timed event and try to break records for “least time needed” to apply a treatment.